Russell J. Bodner, M.D., F.A.A.O.S.

Dr. Bodner earned a Bachelor of Arts in biology and chemistry from the University of Delaware before completing his Medical Degree at the University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine. He performed his residency at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, McKay Laboratory of Orthopaedic Surgery. He has also completed two fellowships: the first at the University of Unfallchirugie, Insbruck, in trauma surgery, and the second at South Lake Tahoe, in sports medicine. Dr. Bodner is board certified and is a member of the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Dr. Bodner’s sub-specialties include hip and knee, as well as sports medicine. He serves as a team physician for the Northern Illinois University Huskies.

On Caring for Patients . . .

It is a pleasure taking care of my various patients, from members of the farming community to university athletes, from children to the elderly. My goal with all patients is to help them achieve their goals, whether that’s simply a return to normal health or getting back to a high level of athletic performance.

On Being Part of the MOI Team . . .

We’ve worked very hard to build a sub-specialty trained practice. That means my practice has narrowed in scope, but that’s a good thing for the patient. Because of the various sub-specialists on our team, we can apply the level of care you would normally find only at a major university hospital. MOI has also invested a great deal in our facilities. We have tried to create the best possible environment for our patients and staff. And our technology allows our physicians to perform complex surgery more quickly and more effectively than ever. MOI does everything first rate.

When I’m not Practicing Medicine . . .

As a young man, I was always interested in sports, which is what really led me down the road to Sports Medicine. I played basketball and other traditional sports, but I was drawn to martial arts. Today, I teach Aikido, which involves understanding your opponent’s joint structure and neurology to redirect their energy against them. However, many martial arts masters were also healers. I think my training in Aikido has sometimes given me some special insights into my patients’ problems. There is really a lot of interesting overlap.